Sunday, 20 March 2011

How Do You Do It?

How do you explain D terminology to your friends/family when they have that 'Huh?' look on their faces after you test?

I had to explain hypo's and hypers to the girls at work yesterday, as I spent the majority of the morning under 4mmol. Luckily a few jelly beans did the trick along with the burger and chips I had for my dinner. YUMMY :D

My short way of explaining was hypo = low (with a low voice and hand gestures) and hyper = high (with high movement and more hand gestures). They know I keep jelly babies and coke etc in my top drawer but I think the look on their faces has made me realise that I need to keep a spare kit and instructions on what to do in an emergency, in my top drawer as well.

A few weeks ago I was talking with another colleague about First Aid and if something should ever happen to me. His answer was mouth-to-mouth and a Mars Bar! My mouth fell open and burst out laughing.. I said erm no thanks just call 999 and explain that I'm Type 1. I think I got a little leaflet from the JDRF pack that I can use so will definately be filling it in asap!

My sugars at the minute are still doing good during the day :) struggling a little with my Lantus still and injection sites in my upper leg, but over the past couple of nights I've upped it to 20-24u which seems to work although it's a big increase from the 14u I use for my stomache!


I'm doing more exercise now at the weekends going to the woods with Amy and her doggies (Robbie licking his nose and Basil behind him) for 1-2 hours which is great, especially as the weathers been so nice. Although leggings and pink wellies do look a bit weird xD

Only half a day at work tomorrow then off until next Monday! Looking forward to some baby lie-ins and doing a bit of Just Dance on the wii to shift some pounds!

xx

2 comments:

Martyn said...

I've explained to my manager about my glucagon needle with when and where to use it. I've also filled in a medical questionnaire which gave me the opportunity to explain in detail what affects diabetes can have on me at work and what I need to do to correct low/high sugars. This is then kept on file and 'management' can have access to it. As far as my day to day colleagues, I've explained a bit, some of them glaze over, others seem to understand, so I'm happy with that. Although in an emergency I don't think I could rely on them to know what to do. They'd just ring 999 and hope for the best I'd think.

Bec said...

It's hard sometimes to explain. I think I make it more confusing for them the more I try it make it clearer!

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